Direct Recruitment Ltd

A degree of stress can be extremely useful, allowing us to perform at our optimum. Unfortunately, however, excess stress dents productivity and engenders a negative working environment. In order to access your full potential, you first need to be in a positive mental space that’s conducive to success.

Now that we in the UK are clocking longer office hours than the vast majority of our European counterparts, with stress levels at a maximum, all senior management teams should be prioritising ways of working smarter, not harder.  Contrary to popular belief, being productive is not the same as being busy!

Feelings of being anxious and strained can arise from a huge range of concerns;  from the fear of being made redundant to nerves over an upcoming presentation. Thankfully, there are a number of steps you can take to help manage these emotions and improve your job satisfaction and general well-being – here are five of them: Read more

Direct Recruitment Ltd

By Sarah Bloomfield on 09.11.17 in Your Career

Whether caused by a seven-year itch or a 3pm slump, the truth is that all of our productivity wanes at some point. The key to maximising your output in the workplace is understanding that it’s not about working harder, but working smarter. It’s about adopting certain practices and sticking with them until they become habit – I’ve listed seven of these which have helped me over the years below.

1.Create a conducive working environment

Considering most of us spend the majority of our week days at our place of work, it should come as no surprise that your office environment has a great effect on your mood and subsequent ability to perform to a high standard. There are many different factors which could affect your happiness in the workplace, from sufficient shrubbery to congenial colleagues. Conduct a full review of your space and, where possible, make recommendations to your human resources/office support team on how to improve conditions. Read more

Direct Recruitment Ltd

Building a team that gels together is a tricky task which eludes many business leaders and managers. It’s relatively easy to recruit and throw together a bunch of high-performing individuals without regard to their different personality types, but this can often lead to internal discord and division later down the line.

That’s why many managers now prioritise personality in the hiring process, often over the candidate’s skillset and past accomplishments. All of your research, interview prep and written documents (CV and cover letter) could amount to nothing if you haven’t given proper consideration to the type of personality the employer will be looking for.

Not everything that a hiring manager needs to know can be communicated on two pages of A4, which is why it’s so important that you convey your full personality during interview. You can certainly hint at the below character traits on all your written documents, but it’s in a face-to-face environment that you’re really given the opportunity to bring them to life. Read more

Direct Recruitment Ltd

Shouting about your own success is uncomfortable for most of us, and understandably so. There is a fine line between being proud of your accomplishments and being brash and boastful, but it’s worth working on because it’s integral to your career progression.

It’s your responsibility to keep your boss updated with your ongoing projects and recent accomplishments; many managers are too busy to appreciate the minutiae of your day-to-day schedule and achievements. Also, if you don’t toot your own horn then who will?

Incorporating a few of these tips into your self-promotion strategy should help you get recognised Read more

Direct Recruitment Ltd

5 steps to conquering interview presentations

It’s becoming increasingly common for our candidates to be asked to present as part of the interview process. Presenting during interview might be a foreign concept to you, but don’t be thrown off by it or let your nerves get the better of you. This is actually the perfect opportunity for you to showcase more of your personality, experience and skills.

It’s very unlikely that you’ll be asked to present during the interview without prior warning. You will usually be told exactly how long you’ll be expected to talk for and on what topic. If you’re not properly briefed on this then it’s not unreasonable to ask; nor is it unreasonable to ask whether a projector/screen will be available, as this will have a bearing on how you approach the presentation.

Think about what those present in the room are going to be looking for. Usually they’re assessing three main things:

• Creativity and knowledge:the content of your presentation, your aptitude for problem solving and how you have used your experience to answer the brief

• Communication skills:your ability to engage with an audience, build rapport and trust

• Time management:your capacity to manage and adapt the pace of the presentation based on frequency of questions/interruptions – so that it finishes on time

Here’s some best practice advice on making a lasting impression – for the right reasons. Read more

Direct Recruitment Ltd

Most of us now understand that a diverse workforce leads to more innovation, better financial performance and improved staff retention, however there are still not enough women in senior positions. Only 7 per cent of FTSE 100 companies have a female CEO, while just 26.1% of boardroom executives (this drops to 19.6% for FTSE 250 firms) are female – ranking the UK sixth in Europe.[1][2]

Why is this and how can it be resolved?

The most commonly cited reason for there being such a disproportionate amount of men in the upper echelons of organisations is of course the difficulty with being both a mum and a successful professional. While the UK’s parental leave policies are far more developed than other advanced western economies, it’s true that they still leave much to be desired – which is why just the week a cross-party committee declared that the government was not doing enough to tackle income disparity.[3] Many organisations struggle to accommodate flexible working, whereby an employee might work half the week from home; however there has been some improvement in this area in recent years. Read more